They Must Read Every Day

They Must Read Every Day

Screen shot 2016-07-14 at 4.26.55 PMI’m not sure what everyone else is reading, but lately I have been addicted to my “Educational Leadership” magazine.  This is ASCD’s flagship publication and I highly recommend it.  Currently, I’m reading an archived issue, ‘Reading-The Core Skill’.  (You can purchase these for approximately $8-$14.)  

As some of you know, I am teaching summer school and working with teacher candidates, a.k.a. student teachers.  I have had the pressure-I mean the privilege!- of sharing everything I can in regards to literacy in 5 weeks.  Gulp.

As if the stars were in alignment, I just happen to have finished Richard Allington and Rachael Gabriel’s phenomenal article, “Every Child, Every Day”.   This article highlights the six elements of effective reading instruction that do not require much time or money.  Please take the time to read the article linked above, but for this post’s sake, I’ll post the six elements of instruction that every child should experience every day.

  1. Every child reads something he or she chooses.
  2. Every child reads accurately.
  3. Every child reads something he or she understands.
  4. Every child writes about something personally meaningful.
  5. Every child talks with peers about reading and writing.
  6. Every child listens to a fluent adult read aloud.

Let’s take some time to focus on element #1.  How can teachers consistently make this happen in their classroom?  Is it possible?  Is there time?  The answer is yes.  It can happen and it must happen.  But we all know the realities of the classroom, and the struggle is real–assemblies, fire drills, sick days, students taking longer than expected on a unit, and the list goes on.  I get it.  So what might we do?

In my next post I will share with you the strategy that finally worked for me.  In my last years in the classroom, I was able to achieve a meaningful reading time every single day.

Advertisements

Constructive Conversations

Constructive Conversations
Justify My Perspective Sentence Frames
Took Kate Kinsella’s sentence frames and formatted them to fit in stand (Staples). One was placed per st group.

If you have been paying attention to the transition to common core, you know that collaborative conversations between students are ESSENTIAL to student learning.  Learning is social; always has been, always will be.  And quality teachers know that quality lessons should include all 4 components of literacy: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  (Some might argue viewing, as well.  Meaning incorporating other forms of media such as video, photographs, etc.)  Many teachers, pre-common core, were incorporating and fostering these types of meaningful conversations.  The common core expectations have simply validated that practice.  It is not new.

In an effort to assist students in participating in and initiating quality dialogue, I decided to create these table toppers for each of my groups.  (My classroom desks are set up in groups as promoted by Kagan.)  One side of the display is taken from the genius guru of vocabulary, Ms. Kate Kinsella.  If you haven’t had the opportunity to attend one of her professional learning sessions, do look her up.  Her work on vocabulary, and her own vocabulary might I add, will have you scrambling for a thesaurus.  It’s remarkable.  Anyway, using her sentence frames , I simply formatted them to fit in an 8 X 11 table topper, purchased at Staples for around $8.

The reverse side of this document is “Kiss These Words Goodbye“.  It’s much like a ‘Dead Words’ or an ‘Instead of _____, Say ______’ poster.  The problem with these posters, I found, was that-when posted on the wall- they were too far away from students, inaccessible, really.  I selected some commonly used Tier 1 words that students cling to..you know the ones, sad-mad-bad-nice, etc.—-then, wrote some synonyms for each.  In my opinion, this table topper worked WAY better than any poster I ever hung on my wall.  The students would CONSTANTLY refer to it, I mean physically pick it up, and read from it.  Amazing!

Kiss These Words Goodbye
Preferred to use this rather than posters or charts on the wall. Easier access for st. to use as reference.

What do you use to expand your students’ everyday vocabulary?  How do you foster collaborative conversations?

 

M&M Introductions

Screen shot 2016-07-11 at 7.05.35 PM
Great Icebreaker! Found on Pinterest! Quick & Easy

Happy July Everyone!

So… what does an educator that has been out of the classroom for a year JUMP at the opportunity to do…why, teach SUMMER SCHOOL, of course!  Yes, you heard me right.  I was given the opportunity to teach a summer enrichment program for upcoming 5th graders and I couldn’t say “yes” fast enough.  The gig is a dream!  I thought, not only can I get back into the classroom to do what I LOVE (teach!), but I also get to mentor 2 student teachers.  I thought I can put all of this professional development that I have had the luxury of receiving to the test!  I’m 4 weeks in, and do not regret the decision.

So first things first, I had to go back into my ‘bag of tricks’ to determine what intro activities I would plan for these students.  Now, mind you, it’s not all day.  The program runs from 8-12 and it’s the students’ summer-all very important things to take into consideration when planning.  The other factor when planning has been ‘what is essential for me to demonstrate to these teacher candidates’?  The entire program is only 5 weeks with the goal that by the end of our time together, they can be deemed ‘intern ready’ and begin applying for teaching jobs.  So I was definitely feeling the pressure of creating the perfect balance of fun (for the kids) and meaningful content (for the student teachers).

Because the program was in a completely different district and I no longer have access to what used to be endless supply of materials, I was also limited in that area.  This 5 weeks was definitely going to sharpen my own instructional planning skills and force me to stick to activities that get the job done in the most inexpensive way possible.  Pretty much every teacher’s goal anyway, right?

One activity that made the cut was one I found on Pinterest a couple of years ago.  It’s pinned on my “Beginning of the Year” board, if you need to reference it.  It’s pretty self explanatory.  I purchased my giant bag of M&Ms from Costco, projected the picture above on the doc cam, gave each group one hard copy for reference (for any students with vision issues or simply those that like it in-hand), and distributed each group a cup of candies.

There you have it!  A quick and easy way to get the students talking and, of course, eating –after they shared.  We modeled what quality conversations look like and sound like prior to the start of the activity.  I find this method a better way to model collaborative, productive, and respectful conversations.  Rather than explain to the students how to talk with a long, drawn out syllabus, actually let them speak and then model, praise, and correct things that you see.

M&M success!

 

 

Penny Kittle Says It All

Not much needs to be said here, watch the video.  She says it all.
Not much needs to be said here, watch the video. She says it all.

This is a stand alone post, something that should be viewed and reflected upon at the beginning of the school year.  Thank you, Penny Kittle.

Take 5 minutes to sit and listen.

Thoughts?

 

Donalyn Miller: The Hero that Liberated Me

Screen shot 2015-08-09 at 10.59.39 AM

A couple of years ago, I was validated and inspired by Ms. Donalyn Miller’s The Book Whisperer.  If you have not yet read this book, it is a must.  Immediately after turning the last page, I went straight to my computer and tried to format and create an effective and explicit way to begin a book challenge.  I cannot express enough how this program has not only liberating me, but also my students.  See you later points, benching students with a book in hand, read only at your level regardless of your interest, ugh.  I’m over all of it.  And Ms. Miller’s book allowed me to feel confident to do what I knew was right all along.

Click Here for formatted documents:  Book Whisperer: 40 Book Challenge

Weekly schedule for Reader's Notebook to hold st. accountable
Weekly schedule for Reader’s Notebook to hold st. accountable

Screen shot 2014-04-06 at 3.24.32 PM

Let’s teach and treat our students as real life readers, so that there just might be a chance for them to unlock and cherish the joy of reading as we all do.

This post will be a number of pictures to better visualize how this might work in your class, tips and lessons learned over the years.

Doesn't have to be pretty. A blank composition book gets the job done. :) 40 Book Challenge
Doesn’t have to be pretty. A blank composition book gets the job done. 🙂
40 Book Challenge
On display for Open House! Students were so proud of all their hard work. Tchr beaming!
On display for Open House! Students were so proud of all their hard work. Tchr beaming!
We tallied up the total number of books read for each group then the entire class. Fantastic!
We tallied up the total number of books read for each group then the entire class. Fantastic!
Love to celebrate our reading accomplishments as a whole!
Love to celebrate our reading accomplishments as a whole!
At the end of the year, we tally all the books we read as a whole. It's an amazing feeling of accomplishment! Sts are so proud! We sort of make the
At the end of the year, we tally all the books we read as a whole. It’s an amazing feeling of accomplishment! Sts are so proud! We sort of make the “reveal” of the total number an event in our class. All our celebrated for their contribution.

Tips for the 40 Book Challenge:

  1.  Composition Books were assembled and explained in class during the first week of school.  (St. HW was to bring in photos, mag pics of things they loved or were interested in, already cut out in a plastic bag.  We modge podged the covers in class.)
  2. Read Alouds are a must!  Let the students experience the joy the picture book.  (Patricia Polacco, Chris Van Allsburg, Dr. Seuss are some of my favs.)
  3. I made sure to have 15 minutes of silent reading time everyday!  It was sacred-never missed.  (I still feel 15 wasn’t long enough.  Would have liked 20, but we had SSR during intervention block as well.)
  4. Get rid or your “extra” stuff.  You know, the “What can I do when I’m finished?” type work.  Just let them READ if they finish tasks early.
  5. Start reading children’s books now!  You need to be able to recommend and guide students to fit their interests and needs, and you can’t do that unless you have read a great number of your grade level’s books.  This was my favorite part of this endeavor.  I now choose to read young adult or children’s novels because they are sooooo amazingly crafted.  It’s been enlightening and kept me “in-touch” with my students.
  6. Make your first order with Scholastic Books the MAX, meaning over $250.  You’ll get the most points at the BOY and that’s how you build your classroom library. (I’ll post more on that later.)
  7. Allow students to abandon a book.  It’s up to the teacher, but my “rule” was that students could only abandon 2 books a trimester.  They had to write a letter explaining why they wanted to abandon this book, only after they had given it a solid try (i.e. read 50 pgs. or a couple of chapters).
  8. Any book you read aloud to the class whether it’s a picture book or novel counts towards their challenge.
  9. Share what you are currently reading energetically and often.  Let them recommend books to you and actually read them!
  10. Start a book club.  Mine was once a week before school.  (I’ll post details later or see earlier posts.)
  11. Make a book recommendation wall or system.  Because you are requiring reads of certain genres, this will help students select ‘good’ stories.  Seeing what their friends have read is great motivation.
St. samples of Reader's Ntbks in action!
St. samples of Reader’s Ntbks in action!
Rd. Ntbks used throughout the year. I loved the 40 Bk challenge!
Rd. Ntbks used throughout the year. I loved the 40 Bk challenge!
Check out how SHE marked, on HER own, that she needed to change her schedule for the week. This is exactly the goal I wanted for my sts.--to be able to assess if they're schedules worked for them a week at a time. Self-monitoring to become real LIFE Readers!!
Check out how SHE marked, on HER own, that she needed to change her schedule for the week. This is exactly the goal I wanted for my sts.–to be able to assess if they’re schedules worked for them a week at a time. Self-monitoring to become real LIFE Readers!!
I annotate the letters to show I read them and model how that is diff for everyone. I also write a short response to kids each week. Sometimes they are a couple of words or a question, sometimes it's a longer response.
I annotate the letters to show I read them and model how that is diff for everyone. I also write a short response to kids each week. Sometimes they are a couple of words or a question, sometimes it’s a longer response.
Another example of my tch annotations or notes to sts each week. I learned more about my st than I EVER had with this 40 book challenge
Another example of my tch annotations or notes to sts each week. I learned more about my st than I EVER had with this 40 book challenge
Some sts preferred to type their letter (or were asked to due to illegible handwriting). No problem here! Note the tchr-st exchange on the left side. IT was awesome! Sts. loved communicating to me through a letter each week.
Some sts preferred to type their letter (or were asked to due to illegible handwriting). No problem here! Note the tchr-st exchange on the left side. IT was awesome! Sts. loved communicating to me through a letter each week.
Another example of a typed letter then glued into their reader's notebook. Up to tch discretion.
Another example of a typed letter then glued into their reader’s notebook. Up to tch discretion.
An example of simple annotations made by the tchr. You don't have to write a novel to each st every week! That would be impossible. Especially with more than one period.
An example of simple annotations made by the tchr. You don’t have to write a novel to each st every week! That would be impossible. Especially with more than one period.
St. sample--simple notes by me again.
St. sample–simple notes by me again. “Not sure. Let’s explore that.” Short, sweet, and to the point. Sometimes I simply wrote “See me” if my question was too long to write.

Welcome Back Everyone!

Here we go again, people!

It’s time for another school year.  (For those that work at a year-round school, you might have long since settled into your classrooms.  Hope it’s going well.) As I mentioned before, I have taken on a new role this year as an instructional coach.  I’m currently on Day 6 and have attended a total of 5 trainings.  I’d say it’s going rather well!  (I’ll speak on the trainings at a later date because I got some really juicy tidbits to share.)  Anyway, even though I don’t have my own classroom, I will still be posting things I have done in the past.  You know, those things that I always said I would blog about…and didn’t.

The most important thing a teacher can do during the first days of school is to build a positive and supportive classroom culture.  The students need to feel safe in order to take academic risks throughout the year.  If the students are not comfortable, collaborative conversations cannot occur and learning will not reaching its optimum potential.  We all know that learning is social.  So if the social environment is not there, students will not achieve their full greatness.

One of my brilliant professors taught me a motto which I have since stolen and slapped on a poster.  He would say, “Everyone participates, everyone learns.  You either do it with us or in front of us.”  He would make us repeat that each day.  So when students felt like not participating in an activity (I like to incorporate dance moves, songs, cheers, etc.), that would be their choice.  But I would remind them that their only other option was to do it ‘in front of us’.  I have yet to have a student come to the front.

Below are some pictures that I will briefly explain.  The “FAIL” poster was always a hit.  Students glanced at it with scary eyes until I explained that failure was welcomed and encouraged in this class.  When we fail, we learn and try again.  Each day I had a different activity for the students to try to practice this concept (i.e. house of cards, math challenges, domino buildings, any fun thing found on my pinterest board).

First Attempt In Learning--create a culture where it's ok to fail!
First Attempt In Learning–create a culture where it’s ok to fail!
Changed around my bk rec. wall because st were struggling with the genres. Needed to bring clarity.
Changed around my bk rec. wall because st were struggling with the genres. Needed to bring clarity.

Above was my revised book recommendation wall. Originally, I had the books only sorted by fictional and informational text.  But because my “40 Book Challenge” required readings of different genres, I needed to categorize the recommendations for the students.

I always took pictures of my kids on the first day of school and made about 6 copies per student.  You’ll notice in my classroom that I have their faces on everything.  I like that personal touch, more so than name tags.  Personal preference.  The Raining Compliments was a way to teach the students how to give and receive meaningful compliments.  One of my classroom jobs was a compliment coordinator.  This person would let me know when each student had at least one compliment in their bag.  Only then would students be able to collect their compliments during dismissal.

Take a pic of kids. Staple each face to a bag to leave throughout the school year.  Teach students how to give quality compliment and st. collect them when everyone has at least one in the bag.
Take a pic of kids. Staple each face to a bag to leave throughout the school year. Teach students how to give quality compliment and st. collect them when everyone has at least one in the bag.
St. filled out a form when they read a book they wanted to rec.  Super easy and st. used as a resource when they didn't know what their next book choice should be.  Power of the Peers!
St. filled out a form when they read a book they wanted to rec. Super easy and st. used as a resource when they didn’t know what their next book choice should be. Power of the Peers!

I know, I know.  Multiplication Jail might be considered too negative.  It depends on the relationship you have with your students.  This is always when I used to give timed math tests (operational drills).  I stopped that practice a couple years ago.  Strain your Brain was simply a fun, critical thinking challenge (usually math) that students tried to solve each week.

Keeping track of fast facts results and weekly brain challenge.
Keeping track of fast facts results and weekly brain challenge.

Love this science challenge of the week.  Again, it was a student’s job.  The less I have to remember, the better for all.  The visual for monitoring the writing process really helped me keep track of where everyone was and who needed help.

Take pics of your students. Slap a magnet on the back and voila!  The students move their head to mark which stage of the writing process they are in.  A perfect visual for both st. and tchrs.
Take pics of your students. Slap a magnet on the back and voila! The students move their head to mark which stage of the writing process they are in. A perfect visual for both st. and tchrs.
Beth Newingham we love you!  After we read any story, I printed out a small image of cover and we placed it in app. spot.  We could then refer to past reads throughout the year.
Beth Newingham we love you! After we read any story, I printed out a small image of cover and we placed it in app. spot. We could then refer to past reads throughout the year.

IMG_6550Pictures on the writing wall too!  I wrote out the steps of the writing process depending on text type so the students could reference it as needed.

P.S.  Love the “Please excuse our bare board.  Our writing is under construction.” sign.  I always felt guilty with a bare board, but this sign liberated me.

 

Questions critical readers need to ponder when reading news, history, etc. Thanks Teaching Channel!
Questions critical readers need to ponder when reading news, history, etc. Thanks Teaching Channel!
Added my own flare to this quality SIOP strategy to mark the text.
Added my own flare to this quality SIOP strategy to mark the text.
Kids LOVED the reading cave!  Also had a couch and cozy chairs in the room.  So easy to please!
Kids LOVED the reading cave! Also had a couch and cozy chairs in the room. So easy to please!

Contacting Parents…Help!

The beginning of the year is full of many things, but the one thing that comes to mind for me is PAPERWORK!  All of those emergency cards, contact information for mom/dad/legal guardian, email addresses, phone numbers, allergies, things the teacher should know, students’ likes and dislikes, etc.

And the majority of it exists simply so we know the best way to contact the parents throughout the year. Really, that’s all we’re looking for.  Can we text you?  Email you?  Call you?  Or should we just send a note home?  Which do you prefer?  Help us out, parents!  Can you please write your email address and/or phone numbers a little more clearly so that I do not enter it incorrectly in my contacts (like I inevitably do every year)?  It’s all so overwhelming….,but if done correctly, saves so much time throughout the year.

Well, because I work at a year round school, my “beginning of the year” is now two months behind me–thank goodness!  I thought I might share some of the beginning of the year forms that I use in hopes of lessening the burden for some of you out there just beginning your school year.

This student information sheet is sent home the first day of school.  I have condensed all crucial info. to one sheet of paper.  The parent contact log is then copied on the backside to be used as needed throughout the year.
This student information sheet is sent home the first day of school. I have condensed all crucial info. to one sheet of paper. The parent contact log is then copied on the backside to be used as needed throughout the year.

 

This log is copied on the back of my student information sheet.  I keep all of these in one binder so that any time I contact a parent, it's easily documented.
This log is copied on the back of my student information sheet. I keep all of these in one binder so that any time I contact a parent, it’s easily documented.

These two forms are copied back to back and given to the students on the first day of school. Parents complete only the student information sheet, as the parent contact log is used as needed throughout the year. I hole-punch these forms and keep them in one small binder. This way I can easily access a parent’s contact information and quickly turn over the paper to document the date, time, and reason for the contact. Not only is it handy, but I feel it’s important to document everything as an educator. You never know when you might need it.

A simple sheet created to obtain parents' phone numbers and permission to TEXT THEM!!! Yay 21st century!
A simple sheet created to obtain parents’ phone numbers and permission to TEXT THEM!!! Yay 21st century!

This sheet was created to move myself and colleagues into the 21st century. Parents are asked if it is ok to text them and to provide the best number to do so. It’s been amazing! You would not believe the power you hold when a student knows that you can text their parent(s) right before their eyes. And now that I have a google voice number— (I’ll discuss that at in future post), the possibilities are endless. I have had such positive feedback from the parents and I feel that my parent/teacher communication has become more effective.

 

I finally made something to send home when I can't read the email address parents write on their contact forms!  Success!
I finally made something to send home when I can’t read the email address parents write on their contact forms! Success!

And finally, this form was created for all the email addresses that I CANNOT READ! It never fails. Every year, I take the time to input all my parents’ email addresses into one group contact. (This way I can send out email blasts to everyone at one time.) Well, every year I enter addresses incorrectly because I cannot read certain email addresses. Is that the letter “i” or the number one…? I mean, really, no matter how many time you write, “Print neatly please.”

Anyway, after I send out my test email. The parents’ email addresses that come back “failed to deliver” receive one of these notices. It’s the first year that I was able to correct all my mistakes! Whoooohoooo!

Student Information Sheet

Parent Contact Log

Technology Contact Sheet

Incorrect Email Alert